Saturday, October 16, 2021

Term1: Criterion C - Creating the solution

In Criterion C, you will start creating your educative program. We now focus on the actual creation of a solution to a problem.

Assessment Criteria:
In this criteria students should be able to;
i. Construct logical plan, which outlines the efficient use of time and resources, sufficient for peers to be able to follow to create the solution
ii. Demonstrate excellent technical skills when making the solution
iii. Follow the plan to create the solution, which functions as intended and is presented appropriately
iv. Explain changes made to the chosen design and plan when making the solution.

Create a challenging and advanced program to score higher.


Strand/Task 1 -Construct a logical plan, which outlines the efficient use of time and resources, sufficient for peers to be able to follow to create the solution 

Start by creating a step-by-step plan including details of the required resources, materials and time to complete. This plan should also take into account quality assurance and control. Think about the tutorials you will use when creating the product. You will learn some new commands looking at some examples on the Internet. That will be part of the plan.

Use the table below to write your Logical plan:



Resources

Resources can be classified as tools or materials.

Tools
Tools can include both digital design tools (hardware and software – input, processing or output devices) and product design tools (hand tools, machinery, CAD software and CAM hardware).

Materials
Materials can be tangible (such as hardwood, nylon or cornstarch), or digital (such as text, fonts, images, audio, videos, animations, sprites, icons).

Example of production plan:


Create a Gantt chart
Gantt or Slippage Charts
A Gantt or a Slippage chart is a graphical display of the timeline of your project’s tasks. To create your Gantt chart you can use Microsoft Excel or Microsoft Word. Look at examples on the Internet.

Example 1 of Gantt Chart



 Example 2 of Gantt Chart



Strand/Task 2: Demonstrate excellent technical skills when making the solution.

Follow the plan to create your product – write a process journal.
Start creating your product and write a process journal. Take screenshots as you create your product and explain what you have done. You have to demonstrate all steps and highlight your technical skills. Be creative and introduce some new features.

Examples:
The following code was written for the parts of the flower. I have used the forever loop so that I am able to move the sprite along with the mouse. This is done so that when the program has started it will sense the mouse and the sprite moves along with it










Follow the plan to create the solution, which functions as intended and is presented appropriately

Present the solution as a whole
Present your final work by showing a few screenshots. Don’t forget to embed your animation on blog.
  





Create a challenging and advanced program to score higher.

Strand 4 -  Explain changes made to the chosen design and plan when making the solution.
Look back on your designs, the plan and your process journal. What changes did you make to your design and your plan? Why did you make them? Justify why you made these changes. Include Images to archive better scores.

Example 



Saturday, October 2, 2021

Term 1: Criterion B - Developing ideas

To complete Criterion B, students should be able to:
i. develop a design specification which outlines the success criteria for the design of a solution based on the data collected
ii. present a range of feasible design ideas, which can be correctly interpreted by others
iii. present the chosen design and outline the reasons for its selection
iv. develop accurate planning drawings/diagrams and outline requirements for the creation of the chosen solution.


Week 1 (3rd October)

Strand 1:Develop a design specification which outlines the success criteria for the design of a solution based on the data collected
Specify what your design should be based on the solution that will solve the problem.

DESIGN SPECIFICATION is a set of guidelines that a designer uses to help design and manufacture a product.

The design specification should have these attributes. For each scene the design specification has to be written in detail.




Strand 2: Present a range of feasible design ideas, which can be correctly interpreted by others.

What is a Design Idea?
Designers do not come up with a single, static idea that solves all aspects of a problem; designs are developed over time in an iterative fashion. Students should record their iterative development through design sketching, modelling, refining and testing. This is all part of design development.

A range is not quantifiable. The number of ideas students will create depends on the complexity of the problem, age, level of experience and time. When students ask how many ideas they should generate, the simple answer is: as many as it takes to solve the problem and to develop a design that meets all of the design specifications.

When developing their design ideas, students must always be working towards the goal of designing a solution to the problem, for which the requirements have been defined through the design specification. Therefore, they must work towards developing at least one design to meet the specification.

To design a product, a natural starting place when designing is with a pencil and sheet of paper, developing rough sketches of potential solutions. You are encouraged to focus on getting the basic building blocks of ideas sketched out. These initial ideas should focus on generating a range of different solutions to the problem.



FEASIBLE IDEAS
A feasible idea is an idea a student could successfully make independently in the given time, with their skills, and with the resources at their disposal.
Students can include ideas in their design folio that do not achieve all specifications successfully, but these ideas should lead to feasible ideas through design development or be constructively criticized through annotation to highlight weaknesses and suggest improvements.
The following questions may help students reflect on their design ideas.
Do I need to do more research to complete my design? For example, how do I join one part of my design to another?
Does the school have the resources (tools, hardware, software) to make the design?
Do I have the skills to make this design? Can I gain the skills to make this design?
Will I have to get any resources myself? If so, where and when?
Will I be able to make this design in the time available?

WHY IS ANNOTATION IMPORTANT?
Annotation is vital for you to communicate the thinking behind your ideas and how that thinking develops. This is why annotation is so important.
Simply sketching ideas will not clearly communicate them, as other people looking at these ideas may not interpret them correctly.

ASK YOURSELF
How did I come up with the idea? Did something influence my thinking?
What Software do I think should be used, and why? Are the materials available.
How could the idea be made? What techniques and coding would I use?
Could the design be made in the time available and with my skills?
Would it require more time than what I have?
Do you think the target audience you mentioned in Criterion A would like the idea?
Why did you choose this colour/texture/background/sprites etc?

Examples

DESIGN SKETCHES - Educative program of the Ear






DESIGN SKETCHES - Educative Program of the Eye.



Week 2 (11th October)

Strand 3: Present the chosen design and outline the reasons for its selection
To present the chosen Design you will first compare it against the Design Specification.

You may evaluate the 2 or 3 ideas sketched against the design specification using the table format given below: 



Design that has met the most requirements will be selected as the final design.

Strand4: 
Develop accurate planning drawings/diagrams and outline requirements for the creation of the chosen solution.

When presenting the final chosen design, you must provide a clear image that clearly shows and highlights details including the written explanation about and features such as colour , form, scripts, sprites and background. (150 words max).


Examples

Example of Requirements for the creation of the Educative Program are;
-Scratch program that can be accessed online or installed.
-Drawn image scanned and uploaded or graphically designed images of the ear and eye to be used as the background.
-Recording equipment (mic) to record voice. 
-"Say", ''touch colour'' and ''voice'' commands to be used in the scratch program.


You are assessed on the quality of your design communication encompassing your sketching, refinement, development, testing and annotation of designs. If I (Teacher) cannot determine or interpret the design, it is not sufficiently represented and the design thinking has not been clearly articulated.

Complete and upload the worksheet on Managebac at the task name; Criterion B:Developing Ideas.

 


Saturday, September 11, 2021

Term1:Criterion A - Inquiring and Analyzing

The Criterion A consists of 4 Strands:
1) Explain and justify the need for a solution to a problem for a specified client/target audience.
2) Identify and prioritize the primary and secondary research needed to develop a solution to the problem.
3) Analyze a range of existing products that inspire a solution to the problem.
4) Develop a detailed design brief which summarizes the analysis of the relevant research.

Imagine you are programmer and you have been asked to create an educational program for your schools or the community using scratch. You need to identify a problem that can be solve by creating the program/product.

Follow the instructions and examples to complete Criterion A in detailed. Upload your word document on Managebac on the task name "Criterion A: Inquiring & Analyzing". You must attend to each strand in detail as explained below. 


Week 4 [27th September]

Task 1 -  Explain and justify the need for a solution to a problem for a specified client/target audience.

Write in detail to explain your design situation/problem
When you write your own design situation/problem you may ask yourself the following questions:
1) What is the problem?
2) Where is the problem occurring?
3) Who is facing the problem? 
4) What is the cause of the problem?
5) What will you design and make to solve the problem?
6) How will your product solve the problem?

Example

Introduction:
Transportation is very essential in today's world. Without transport it is difficult to move people, animals and goods from one place to another. With the different modes of increased transportation different kinds of vehicles are seen on road for this. We have 2 wheelers, 4 wheelers, large trucks, trains, aeroplanes etc. Out of all this cars are becoming very common these days as people use it for commuting to their places of work easily. In every house the scenario is such that there will be a minimum of 2 vehicles per family. 

Design situation:
The situation that I am going to deal with is parking of cars. I have seen that even though people learn driving and get their license they find it very difficult to park their car especially in the case of reverse parking. I would like to make a game on Scratch that teaches people to analyse the correct time to turn so as to park it into the parking slot without facing difficulty. This parking problem is mainly seen in new drivers and when the parking is between 2 cars. Through this game I would like to cover the different aspects of parking so that people will find it easier to navigate their car in the real life situations. Also small children may use this game to improve their cursor control skills with the help of the arrow keys.

Task 2 - Identify and prioritize the primary and secondary research needed to develop a solution to the problem.

Primary research - involves the collection of original primary data by researchers.  It can be accomplished through various methods, including questionnaires and telephone interviews.

Secondary research - Involves data collected by other people.

Ways of Gathering Information

  • Through interviews with the person who will use the product
  • Through papers and different websites advertised
  • Through Internet sources, Magazines and books
  • Reading files, folders and other materials used in the company
  • Observing how the work is performed.

Primary and secondary research



Identify the relevant data that needs to be collected, where it will be sourced from, whether sources are primary or secondary and which sources are essential and which are desirable. Include the research done.

Follow your plan and conduct the research. Demonstrate the research done with surveys sheets or links, interview conversations or questioners and summary of articles found online/books. Remember to reference your work. 

Examples of the plans 





Examples of the research done

Interview:-
Me: Good Evening Ms. Brown

Ms. Brown : Good Evening
Me: I am so thankful that you have given me some time to do this interview with you. I am having this
project in school to complete and I have come with the idea of teaching parking of cars to young adults
as it is an issue that they currently face. And you being a new driver too will be able to answer a few of
my Questions.


Pictures of car parking taken from recordings.



Week 1 [4th October]

Task 3 -Analyse a range of existing products that inspire a solution to the problem.

SWOT ANALYSIS OF EXISITING SOLUTIONS



Examples


Reverse Camera - SWOT Analysis

The picture below shows SWOT Analysis for an existing product. The SWOT Analysis is not complete. This is just an example. Please use it as a sample to understand what needs to be done.


Task 4 - Develop a detailed design brief which summarizes the analysis of the relevant research.

Design Brief: The Design Brief is a short statement of what you are going to make, why you are going to make it, and for whom you are making it for.

A Design Brief - is a student's response to the Design Situation based on his/her research detailing how he/she intends to solve the problem. This will be a summary of the Research that he/she has found out which will lead to developing a Design specification.


Example of a design brief 
         
New young drivers and not so experienced drivers find time a constraint when it comes to parking and think they can utilize their time to get to work or carry out leisure activities whilst looking at their own convenience. This causes stress to others who come looking for parking slots and find a car double parked or not parked properly. I will design a game that new young drivers can utilize in their spare time or at their own convenience. It will be a user friendly game and young drivers may find it adequate to learn techniques to park their more efficiently in a fun way.
        
After analysing the different solutions for learning how to park cars I have come to the conclusion that the game that I will be developing can be used by a new learner who wants to learn how to drive. The person may be given a few simulation classes about how to park before he actually tried it on road so that he is able to refine his skills when he is on road. My game is going to consist of 3 kinds of parking:- Reverse, Angle and parallel parking. In the Reverse parking I will be putting up a back ground which shows a number of cars parked on the road with a vacant slot between 2 cars.


DESIGN BRIEF FOR THE PARKING SCENARIO.

After analysing the different solutions for learning how to park cars I have come to the conclusion that the game that I will be developing can be used by a new learner who wants to learn how to drive. The person may be given a few simulation classes about how to park before he actually tried it on road so that he is able to refine his skills when he is on road. My game is going to consist of 3 kinds of parking:- Reverse, Angle and parallel parking. In the Reverse parking I will be putting up a back ground which shows a number of cars parked on the road with a vacant slot between 2 cars.